Category Archives: feature

Amazing lack of interest

I have had this poll on the left up for a month or so.

Since then, over 2000 people have looked at it. image Since I am using Qarbon’s free trial, I exceeded my daily limit many times since it was posted. An yet, 13 people have voted. This is probably a good reflection of what we can expect at the polls this fall. Lot’s of talk and views, but no action.

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What a beautiful amateur coat you have

 Kim Cameron does a book review of The Cult of the Amateur. The title of his post is “Emperor of the Amateurs” I assume this is as in the the Emperor has no clothes. I saw this guy peddling his book on the Colbert Report the other night. Both Judith and I looked at each other and said, “can this guy be real?” I am glad to see others that have actually done the work of ferreting out the bastard.

“How today’s Internet is killing our culture” my ass.

How blogs, MySpace, YouTube, and the rest of today's user-generated media are destroying our economy, our culture, and our values

If you are looking for a real hoot, and have nothing enjoyable or worthwhile to do, consider spending an hour (no more) with Andrew Keen’s The Cult of the Amateur.  Whatever you do, don’t buy it – you’re sure to find discarded copies lying around.  Mine, for example.

Identity – Digital Identity, Privacy, and the Internet’s Missing Identity Layer

MS Goes Open Source to Boost Identity Management

I’m not sure what this means yet. I will call Kim and find out.I think it is a good idea, but under what license agreement. Certainly not the GPL! 

Microsoft is launching a slew of initiatives to help Web sites identify visitors.
First, the company is kicking off four open-source projects to support the development of ID cards for online users. Microsoft is also releasing one of its identity management specs, Identity Selector Interoperability Profile, under its OSP (Open Specification Promise), meaning the specification is clear of licensing fees or patent worries.

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Finally, Microsoft is responding to users’ requests for better direct synchronization of identity information between Active Directory and the OpenLDAP Directory using Microsoft ILM (Identity Lifecycle Manager) 2007 by collaborating on an open-source project with Kernel Networks and Oxford Computer Group to create an OpenLDAP adapter for Microsoft ILM 2007.

Source: MS Goes Open Source to Boost Identity Management

 

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Things Computers Can Do in Movies

 My wife hates it when I point these little details out in a movie. Face it, computer use in movies is only enabled by a strong dose of suspension of disbelief.

Writing by admin on Sunday, 8 of April , 2007 at 6:47 am

1. Word processors never display a cursor.
2. You never have to use the space-bar when typing long sentences.
3. Movie characters never make typing mistakes.
4. All monitors display inch-high letters.
5. High-tech computers, such as those used by NASA, the CIA or some such governmental institution, will have easy to understand graphical interfaces.
6. Those that don’t have graphical interfaces will have incredibly powerful text-based command shells that can correctly understand and execute commands typed in plain English.
7. Note: Command line interfaces will give you access to any information you want by simply typing, “ACCESS THE SECRET FILES” on any near-by keyboard.
8. You can also infect a computer with a destructive virus by simply typing “UPLOAD VIRUS”. (See “Fortress”.)
9. All computers are connected. You can access the information on the villain’s desktop computer even if it’s turned off.
10. Powerful computers beep whenever you press a key or the screen changes. Some computers also slow down the output on the screen so that it doesn’t go faster than you can read. (Really advanced computers will also emulate the sound of a dot-matrix printer.)
11. All computer panels operate on thousands of volts and have explosive devices underneath their surface. Malfunctions are indicated by a bright flash of light, a puff of smoke, a shower of sparks and an explosion that causes you to jump backwards.
12. People typing on a computer can safely turn it off without saving the data.
13. A hacker is always able to break into the most sensitive computer in the world by guessing the secret password in two tries.
14. You may bypass “PERMISSION DENIED” message by using the “OVERRIDE” function. (See “Demolition Man”.)
15. Computers only take 2 seconds to boot up instead of the average minutes for desktop PCs and 30 minutes or more for larger systems that can run 24 hours, 365 days a year without a reset.
16. Complex calculations and loading of huge amounts of data will be accomplished in under three seconds. Movie modems usually appear to transmit data at the speed of two gigabytes per second.
17. When the power plant/missile site/main computer overheats, all control panels will explode shortly before the entire building will.
18. If you display a file on the screen and someone deletes the file, it also disappears from the screen (See “Clear and Present Danger”).
19. If a disk contains encrypted files, you are automatically asked for a password when you insert it.
20. Computers can interface with any other computer regardless of the manufacturer or galaxy where it originated. (See “Independence Day”.)
21. Computer disks will work on any computer has a floppy drive and all software is usable on any platforms.
22. The more high-tech the equipment, the more buttons it will have (See “Aliens”.)
23. Note: You must be highly trained to operate high-tech computers because the buttons have no labels except for the “SELF-DESTRUCT” button.
24. Most computers, no matter how small, have reality-defying three-dimensional active animation, photo-realistic graphics capabilities.
25. Laptops always have amazing real-time video phone capabilities and performance similar to a CRAY Supercomputer.
26. Whenever a character looks at a monitor, the image is so bright that it projects itself onto their face. (See “Alien” or “2001″)
27. Searches on the internet will always return what you are looking for no matter how vague your keywords are. (See “Mission Impossible”, Tom Cruise searches with keywords like “file” and “computer” and 3 results are returned.)

Source: Programming Blog – Problems & Solutions, Tips & Tricks » Things Computers Can Do in Movies

Kim Cameron’s Identity Weblog » If they don’t scan, they don’t eat

Kim is posting a series of articles about biometrics and biometrics usage in schools. Very scary stuff. 

Posted on Thursday 29 March 2007

The more I look into this story, the worse it gets.  We don’t have to go to Britain for examples of child fingerprinting – just take a look at this email from a lady in Illinois:

Kim,

My name is Joy and I am continuing to get the word out & tell this true story.

In August 2005, our public school district with less than 500 students decided to start using biometric equipment for “accounting purposes”.  We were told at registration to take our children over and have them scanned.  (There was not an opt out or opt in policy).

I objected and said no – our children are not to use this equipment -especially when there is not a policy to look over.

We were told, “if they don’t scan ,they don’t eat.”

I explained I believed that to against the law and the rights of the children as well as parental rights.  I was then told that this equipment would put Earlville, Illinois on the map (not like they thought).  A few days later I gave birth to our youngest daughter, on Aug 20, 2005, and explained to my husband that when I recovered I was going to discuss this matter with the district administration again.

Meanwhile my eldest children Brooke & Gunner were still brown bagging it.  Well, Sept 21, 2005 my 7 year old son was scanned anyway – even though he reminded the “tech director” that he was not to scan.

I of course called the school and started recieving excuses from the adminstrative staff.  I went to the local paper, the school board and still did not feel as if we were getting very far with our objection.  I then decided to write to Illinois legislators and the media.

Senator Miquel Del Valle introduced SB 2549 in Jan, 2006. CBN came to our town and interviewed us (as well as Senator Miquel Del Valle on a different date.)  The story aired Nov 7, 2006.  Then Senator Miguel Del Valle stepped down and took another position in Chicago. SB 2549-session sine die.

There I was again writing and calling the media and legislators.  In Jan,  2007 I was invited to speak with some privacy advocates and share this almost unbelievable story.  In Feb, 2007 two bills were introduced and are passing:  HB 1559,  introduced by State Rep Bob Pritchard; and SB 1702, introduced by Senator Kim Lightford.

I have several newspaper articles as well as letters from the Superintendant stating that my 7 yearr old son willingly gave up his finger.  Info about this story can also be found on EFFs deeplinks ,the Cato Institute,The End times and of course the CBN website.   As soon as I get updated on the bills I can notify you.   In the meantime I will continue to get the word out and search for advice on this matter .

I had my finger impression scanned for an Illinois licensure requirement, however I am a mother of five, over 30 and a private detective.

Not a minor child trying to by hot lunch at school.  We know that the data on these children can be sold, given away and anyone who knows how to write a FOIA can have access to this info. 

Joy Robinson-Van Gilder

Source: Kim Cameron’s Identity Weblog » If they don’t scan, they don’t eat

Now that’s interop!

 Yawn. Too little too late. Who cares? Novell has slid to the insignificant.

Now that’s interop!

Check out Novell’s BrainShare keynote for an amazing demo of the interoperability they have built between Novell eDirectory and Microsoft Active Directory. You can fast-forward to the demo if you’re impatient. It’s at 1:15:43 and it is awesome.
In an earlier post (Jan. 18/07) I mentioned that BrainShare would be the first true test of the agreement – Would a Microsoft executive speak? Answer = yes! Craig Mundie from Microsoft was on-stage with Novell’s CTO for a fireside chat.
Novell basically demoed the software I mentioned in yesterday’s post called Novell Domain Services for Windows. Some of the key things shown during the demo included:

  • Creating a user via the ADUC MMC but the user created is actually added to eDirectory
  • Modified the added user via iManager and refreshed the MMC to see the change appear
  • Set up a two-way trust between two companies (acme.com and widget.com)
  • Enabled sharing a folder in one company for a specific user in the other company
  • From the other company logged in as that user and accessed that resource

Very nice indeed. Good work guys!

Source: Jackson’s Identity Management & Active Directory Reality Tour Travelblog: Now that’s interop!

MHackers selling IDs for $14, Symantec says

This is old news, but it still scares me. What is an identiy worth these days?

 

Hackers selling IDs for $14, Symantec says

By Jeremy Kirk, IDG News Service

Identity thieves are offering a person’s credit-card number, date of birth and other sensitive information for as little as US$14 over the Internet, said a new report on online threats released Monday.

The data is sold on so-called “underground economy servers,” used by criminal organizations to hawk information they’ve captured through hacking, Symantec said in its Internet Security Threat Report, which tracked online trends from June to December 2006. The information can then be used for identity scams such as opening a bank account in a false name.

“U.S.-based credit cards with a card verification number were available for between US$1 to $6, while an identity — including a U.S. bank account, credit card, date of birth and government-issued identification number — was available for between $14 to $18,” the report said.

Source: Macworld: News: Hackers selling IDs for $14, Symantec says